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Thought of the Day: Video Games and the Human Heart

By Carla B.

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Best Movie Quotes: Film – Beta Test (Directed by Nicholas Gyeney)

“One thing we must acknowledge as a leader in this field is our responsibility to shape our society. If you look where we’ve come, or arguably where we’ve fallen to, you have to ask yourself, what happened to our humanity and where did it go? In my new position, my focus is to return the spotlight to the gamers. I find that the single most important thing. And hopefully if we’re smart enough, we can remind our consumers to engage in balance, to remember what makes them human in the first place. In between missions of course. ” — Movie: Beta Test (Character Max Troy played by Larenze Tate)

“Any ambitious man would dream of reaching the top. To deny that would deny my own humanity, I think. Andrew Kincaid was a god in his own world, and any god who is obsessed with his own power sets himself up for his own demise. And that power falls on his angels. Someone had to take up the reigns. All we can do is hope for a fresh perspective. Ultimately it’s up to us to enter this world, to take up that controller, to make those decisions. Ultimately it’s your quarter.” — Movie: Beta Test (Character Max Troy played by Larenze Tate)
 

Image credit: Mirror Images LTD

      Compassion and Empathy is something Humanity must not lose…

Healing The Heart ....

Today, video games play a big role in many of our lives — as it is often the go to source of entertainment. It’s been proven that in a large number of American households  there is little fun time spent -aside from playing sports outside -without an X Box, Nintendo or Sony controller in the hand — and most recently, smart phones….and for good reason…?? As there is no denying that for many, video games can be incredibly fun to play. I still remember to this day how immersed I became in games such as Super Mario and Pac Man — all of which managed to preoccupy countless hours of my childhood. With the gaming industry capabilities consistently improving I find it interesting to explore just how big of a role video games play in our modern society and whether or not they are having any lasting effects on those who play them. According to a study released by statista in September of 2014, global video game revenues exceed $100 billion, with $6.1 billion of that being generated by video game sales in the United States alone.(1) These already staggering numbers become even more surprising when one takes into consideration the state of the US economy. How much of that $100 billion is being spent by families and individuals who cannot comfortably afford to buy that $59.99 game or that $349.99 system? In terms of time — which is arguably our most precious commodity -in 2013 the average US gamer over the age of 13 spent 6.3 hours a week playing video games -which is up from an average of 5.6 hours spent in 2012.(2) Violence, in some way shape or form has been a predominant theme in the world of video games for quite sometime. The numbers support the basis whereas the action and shooter genres, which account for a combined 51.9% of video game sales in the US in 2013. Even if masked under the intentions of playing a hero whose sole purpose is to destroy a series of “enemies” to save the world, violence is violence and gamers seem to love to engage in it virtually.

Image credit: Getty

So, it would not be presumptuous to add that many of the  video games we see and interact with today allow gamers to be as brutal as they like — within a very realistic scenario. Users can simply go up to someone — on any given street and attack them, use their vehicles to run a person down, and or even carjack them. Sexism, violence and hatred are the video game industries biggest proponents today. It seems the goal is to systematically desensitize and erode our natural empathy, our innate state of being — of oneness. Sadly, what we are seeing today are individuals being brutalized on any given street corner by someone — and passerbys simply standing by and doing nothing. In many of these cases there is hardly ever anyone coming forward to help. Why is this? Could all this violence that is engaged in virtually by so many of us worldwide be creating some sort of dark effect on us? And most importantly, is it desensitizing us? Why are we allowing this to happen? I can remember back in the day, before all this new technology arrived whereas our very own pocket communities banned together to assist one another in times of need. We sought out, maybe only **subconsciously— to be a service to others, our neighbors, friends and humanity as a whole. With this being said, I guess the only question that really needs answering is: What can we do to reconnect with our heart?? A 2011 study out of the University of Missouri-Columbia looked at the long recognized belief held by many scientists that playing violent video games can cause players to become more aggressive in their daily life. The researchers measured brain responses as they showed the participants a series of neutral and violent photos. The final stage allowed the participants to compete against an opponent in a controllable task that allowed them to choose how aggressively they would blast their opponent with sound. Researchers found that those who played a violent video game were more aggressive in their blast by comparison to those who played a non-violent game. Another study in the publication Social Psychological and Personality Science, found that aggression triggered by video games can last for up to 24 hours after the game is played -if the player continues to think about the game. The authors of the study noted that violent gamers often play for a lot longer than the 20 minutes they were allotted in this particular study, making it more likely that they let thoughts of it marinate within their mind habitually. Several authorities, including the US Supreme Court, the US Surgeon General, the Federal Trade Commission and Federal Communications Commission all stand on the side of there being no causal link between violent video games and violent behaviour. Any theories to the contrary they state are a myth, and in response have compiled a list of research to support this stance. They do advise however that individuals -especially parents -make informed decisions about what they do and do not choose to expose themselves to. Each game is subject to a rating and suggested age range, and all major gaming systems are required to have programmable parental controls. As with so many other things in the world today, I’m finding that the best solution always lies within. When deciding whether or not to expose yourself to violent video games, observe how you feel when you play them. Scan your heart. Are they purely an entertaining experience that you are easily able to disconnect from? Or are they an escape that allows you to release frustrations, negative feelings and emotions? I’d also advise to look within when deciding whether or not play video games at all. Observe your behavioral patterns to see whether you are simply engaging in an available form of entertainment or if it has become a habitual decision. Be sure to be honest with yourself when analyzing this as well, as you won’t be doing anyone a favor by masking how playing as much as you do makes you feel. I personally do not think that video games are inherently good or bad. They aren’t for everyone, and there is a time and place for them for those who enjoy them. It’s up to us to decipher just how much and when that is, if at all. Ultimately, it should never be okay to advocate any kind of violence in video games — regardless of how the 1 percent spins it. Thoughts? Please share below in the comments.

Heart Chakra | Human Energy Flow - Image credit: HumanEnergyFlow.com

RELATED: The Heart Chakra and its meaning for the human body My prayers and hopes today, right now… is for us all to take a step back, look within and exude our true power in light and love. Connecting with our heart is what we should be doing…not disconnecting from it….regardless of what life experience we may be working through. We must not lose our humanity. Peace and blessing, Namaste. Thoughts? Please share below in the comments. SEE ALSO: The Universal Law of Freewill

Our Truth is not Out there…. it is Within.

**Subconscious: acting or existing without one’s awareness: subconscious motive. noun. 2. (psychoanal) that part of the mind which is on the fringe of consciousness and contains material of which it is possible to become aware by redirecting attention Compare preconscious (sense 2), unconscious

Sources: (1) http://www.statista.com/topics/868/video-games/ (2) http://time.com/120476/nielsen-video-games/ (3) http://www.statista.com/statistics/189592/breakdown-of-us-video-game-sales-2009-by-genre/ (4) http://metro.co.uk/2014/01/16/100-best-selling-video-games-of-2013-revealed-4265929/ (5) http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110525151059.htm (6) http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100920094620.htm (7) http://www.theesa.com/facts/violence.asp

Listen to this author on EOTM/Universal Wave Radio

A Cursory Look at Sci Fi Movies and Artificial Intelligence – A.I.

By Carla B.

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There has been no shortage of Super Hero/Humans/Hybrids in Science Fiction films, they are everywhere. Captain America, Spider-man, Superman, The Fantastic Four, Thor, Lucy, Will Caster, and you can now add Ava to the list. “The world’s first true artificial intelligence, housed in the body of a beautiful robot girl,”….??

Alicia Vikander in 'Ex Machina.' -- Image credit: A24 /DNA Films

Something to ponder. What would you do if you could access 100% of your brain’s potential processing power? Something to think about, indeed.

Image Credit: Alcon Entertainment - Transcendence

The video below by Makalesi, an independent researcher of the occult and other esoteric knowledge explains how the concept of Artificial Intelligence aka A.I. — is a reoccurring concept that has been covered by both, the big and small screens.

RELATED: Scarlett Johansson as “Lucy” – More Transhumanist Propaganda (VIDEO)

In the segment Makalesi also details how social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Yelp and LinkedIn…. plays an intricate part in the grand scheme of things…along with search engines.

SEE ALSO: Classic “Matrix Reloaded” Quotes – Sci-Fi Movies

What are your thoughts? What are we being prepared for is the real question. Share with us in the comments below.

Sony Pictures ‘The Interview’ to be screened in US

By Cain Cawthon

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A comedy film about North Korea that had its Christmas Day launch cancelled after a major cyber attack and threats against US cinema-goers is now to get a limited theatrical release, Sony says.

Sony film The Interview has featured highly in hackers' demands - Image credit: Sony Pictures

The Interview will be shown in some independent US cinemas on Thursday.

Sony Chairman Michael Lynton said he was “excited” that the comedy, about a plot to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, would now be seen.

Two cinemas in Atlanta and Austin have already revealed screenings.

They said via social media that Sony Pictures had authorised them to show the film, which has been at the centre of escalating tensions between the US and North Korea.

“Breaking news,” tweeted Tim League, founder of the Alamo Drafthouse cinema in Austin.

“Sony has authorized screenings of THE INTERVIEW on Christmas Day. We are making shows available within the hour.”

‘Freedom prevailed’

The White House welcomed the development, with a spokesman saying that President Barack Obama applauded Sony’s decision and that the US was a country that “believes in free speech”.

Seth Rogen, who directed and starred in the film, tweeted: “The people have spoken! Freedom has prevailed! Sony didn’t give up!”

Sony had previously announced that the film’s release would be pulled completely, following a hacking attack on the company and threats against cinema chains that planned to screen the film.

That decision drew criticism in Hollywood, with some calling it an attack on the freedom of expression.

Mr Obama had also called Sony’s initial decision to pull the film “a mistake”.

‘First step’

Major movie chains in the US are thought unlikely to take part in the release at this stage.

Mr Lynton said: “We are continuing our efforts to secure more platforms and more theatres so this movie can reach the largest possible audience.”

He also said he “hoped it would be the first step of the film’s release”.

The company has yet to reveal further details of its release plans, but there is also speculation that video on-demand (VOD) will be offered as part of the package.

Sony’s North Korean comedy The Interview, starring James Franco and Seth Rogen, is a classic fish-out-of-water caper – with the odd twist that the fish end up assassinating a world leader.

But is it any good? For now, you can only form an opinion by watching the trailer. But critics who saw the movie in advance had mixed feelings, to say the least.

What is The Interview really like?

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Sony’s decision to show the film came hours after North Korea suffered a severe internet outage that effectively shut down its internet services for 10 hours.

It was not clear what caused this. North Korean officials have not commented on the issue.

The country’s internet services appeared to suffer a second outage on Tuesday afternoon, but they were restored in under an hour, an internet monitoring company said.

US officials have declined to comment on who might have been responsible for the shutdown.

Mr Obama has previously vowed to respond to a hacking attack on Sony, which led to sensitive data and unreleased film material being leaked.

The US said an FBI investigation showed that North Korea was responsible for the cyber attack on Sony – claims denied by North Korea.

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The Interview sagaThe Interview features James Franco and Seth Rogen as two journalists granted an audience with Mr Kim. The CIA then enlists the pair to assassinate him.

News Source: BBC

More on This Story

  • Sony hack: North Korea threatens US as row deepens


EOTM Movie Critics: “American Sniper” Gets It Right – Trailer

By Maya Felts

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A superb performance by Bradley Cooper anchors Clint Eastwood’s harrowing and thoughtful dramatization of the life of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle

Image credit: Warner Bros

 

A skillful, straightforward combat picture gradually develops into something more complex and ruminative in Clint Eastwood’s “American Sniper,” an account of the Iraq War as observed through the rifle sights of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, whose four tours of duty cemented his standing as the deadliest marksman in U.S. military history. Hard-wiring the viewer into Kyle’s battle-scarred psyche thanks to an excellent performance from a bulked-up Bradley Cooper, this harrowing and intimate character study offers fairly blunt insights into the physical and psychological toll exacted on the front lines, yet strikes even its familiar notes with a sobering clarity that finds the 84-year-old filmmaker in very fine form. Depressingly relevant in the wake of recent headlines, Warners’ Dec. 25 release should drum up enough grown-up audience interest to work as a serious-minded alternative to more typical holiday fare, and looks to extend its critical and commercial reach well into next year.

Although Steven Spielberg was set to direct before exiting the project last summer (just a few months after Kyle’s death in Texas at the age of 38), “American Sniper” turns out to be very much in Eastwood’s wheelhouse, emerging as arguably the director’s strongest, most sustained effort in the eight years since his WWII double-header of “Flags of Our Fathers” and “Letters From Iwo Jima.” As was clear in those films and this one, few directors share Eastwood’s confidence with large-scale action, much less his inclination to investigate the brutality of what he shows us — to acknowledge both the pointlessness and the necessity of violence while searching for more honest, ambiguous definitions of heroism than those to which we’re accustomed. In these respects and more, Kyle — who earned the nickname “Legend” from his fellow troops, achieved a staggering record of 160 confirmed kills, and became one of the most coveted targets of the Iraqi insurgency — makes for a uniquely fascinating and ultimately tragic case study.

We first meet Kyle (Cooper) as he’s hunched over a rooftop overlooking a blown-out structure in Fallujah, Iraq, taking deadly aim at a local woman and her young son walking some distance away; only Kyle’s specific vantage allows him to see that they’re preparing to lob a grenade at nearby Marines. The fraught situation and its queasy-making stakes thus introduced, the film abruptly flashes back some 30-odd years to Kyle’s Texas childhood, establishing him as a skilled shooter at a young age (played by Cole Konis) as well as a brave protector to his younger brother, Jeff (Luke Sunshine). After a brief rodeo career, Cooper’s Kyle joins the ranks of the Navy SEALs, whose brutal training regimen — including the muddy beachfront endurance tests of the dreaded Hell Week — is depicted more extensively here than they were in last year’s military-memoir adaptation “Lone Survivor.”

Bradley Cooper stars in American Snyper - Image credit: Warner Bros

As scripted by Jason Hall (paring down Kyle’s 2012 autobiography, written with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice), these flashbacks form the film’s most conventional stretch, including a tartly humorous scene at a bar where Kyle charms his way past the defenses of the beautiful Taya (Sienna Miller), despite her early claim that she’d never date one of those “arrogant, self-centered pricks” who call themselves SEALs. Yet Kyle belies that description, revealing himself as a God-fearing, red-blooded American galvanized into fighting, as so many were, by the shock of 9/11 and his determination to avenge his country. Indeed, the ink is barely dry on his and Taya’s marriage license when Kyle gets shipped off to Fallujah, where he and his comrades are well served by his exceptional abilities as a sniper.

SEE ALSO: 1998 Movie ‘Deep Impact’ And its Likeness To “Comet 67P” And NASA’s Orion

It’s here that the story catches up with that tense mother-and-child setup, this time not sparing us the gruesome, inevitable aftermath. Describing his actions to a fellow soldier, Kyle breathes, “That was evil like I had never seen before” — a statement that lingers meaningfully as we watch him racking up kill after kill, efficiently dispatching the male Iraqi insurgents he spies surreptitiously arming themselves in a back alley, or driving a car bomb in the direction of American soldiers. In each of these life-or-death scenarios, Kyle must use what little time he has to swiftly assess whether his targets indeed pose an immediately actionable threat, lest he face recriminations from lawyers, liberals and other members of the Blame America First crowd (a point the book drives home far more vehemently than the film).

Not surprisingly, Eastwood avoids wading into the ideological murk of the situation and sticks tightly to Kyle’s p.o.v., yielding an almost purely experiential view of the conflict in which none of the other soldiers becomes more than a two-dimensional sketch, dates and locations are rarely identified, and any larger geopolitical context has been deliberately elided. (Some details have clearly been fudged; Kyle says he’s 30 when he enlists, but he was actually in his mid-20s.) Yet the achievement of “American Sniper” is the way it subtly undermines and expands its protagonist’s initially gung-ho worldview, as Eastwood deftly teases out any number of logistical and ethical complications: Kyle’s frustration at always having to engage from a distance rather than on the ground with his comrades; the sometimes difficult collaboration between the SEALs and the less well-trained Marines, especially when they begin the dangerous task of clearing out Iraqi houses; and above all, the near-impossibility of figuring out whom to trust in an environment where everyone is presumed hostile.

This becomes especially crucial when Kyle and company receive orders to take down the Al Qaeda terrorist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and his vicious second-in-command, the Butcher (Mido Hamada), named in part for his imaginative use of power drills. The hunt for the Butcher — and, eventually, a Syrian-born sniper named Mustafa (Sammy Sheik), whose lethal precision rivals Kyle’s own — leads the troops into a series of breathless skirmishes, from a horrific Al Qaeda attack on the family of an Iraqi sheikh (Navid Negahban) to a nighttime ambush that develops as a result of Kyle’s extraordinary perceptiveness in a seemingly benign situation. Working as usual with d.p. Tom Stern and editors Joel Cox and Gary D. Roach, Eastwood handles these ambitious setpieces with an unfussy professionalism worthy of his subject, the camera maintaining a gritty, ground-level feel (with the exception of a few crane shots demanded by the complex staging of the film’s climactic shootout) while switching deftly among a range of perspectives that nonetheless maintain a strong continuity of action.

Less adroitly handled are the regular cutaways to Taya and their two children back in Texas, providing necessary but over-emphatic reminders that Kyle’s loved ones are paying dearly for his military service. Taya seems to have a bad habit of catching her husband on the phone at those unfortunate moments when mortar and shrapnel are exploding around him (which is understandably often). When he’s home on leave, he’s painfully distant, reluctant to talk about his experiences and barely able to function, which is Taya’s cue to spout some gratingly obvious dialogue of the “Even when you’re here, you’re not here” variety. What works in these scenes, however, is the disquieting sense that Kyle’s normal life has shifted into the war zone, and that his time with his family is passing him by in fast, jarring blips; we see his kids at only brief intervals here, and the rate at which they grow up must be as startling for him as it is for us.

In its revelation of character through action, its concern with procedure rather than politics, and its focus on an exceptionally gifted U.S. soldier struggling to make sense of his small yet essential place in a war he only partly understands, Eastwood’s picture can’t help but recall “The Hurt Locker,” and if it’s ultimately a more earnest and prosaic, less formally daring affair than Kathryn Bigelow’s film, it nevertheless emerges as one of the few dramatic treatments of the U.S.-Iraq conflict that can stand in its company. And just as “The Hurt Locker” found revelatory depths in Jeremy Renner, so “American Sniper” hinges on Cooper’s restrained yet deeply expressive lead performance, allowing many of the drama’s unspoken implications to be read plainly in the actor’s increasingly war-ravaged face.

Cooper, who packed on 40 pounds for the role, is superb here; full of spirit and down-home charm early on, he seems to slip thereafter into a sort of private agony that only those who have truly served their country can know. (A late sequence shot in an impenetrable sandstorm provides the most literal possible metaphor for his own personal fog of war.) Perhaps the film’s most humanizing touch is its willingness to show Kyle not just reacting but thinking, attempting to grasp ideas that have thus far eluded him, whether he’s spending time with veterans who have lost limbs and worse on the battlefield; coming to grips with the difference between him and his reluctant-Marine brother (Keir O’Donnell); or shrugging awkwardly when someone calls him a “hero,” as if the word were a particularly ill-fitting sweater.
Fandango’s Hobbit Movie Guide
While the circumstances of Kyle’s death add a note of tragic urgency to the film’s matter-of-fact examination of post-traumatic stress disorder, the moment itself is left offscreen, a decision that feels consistent with the scrupulous restraint that characterizes the production as a whole. The visual and editorial choices discreetly reinforce the clash between the hell of modern warfare (the color all but drained away from Stern’s images) and the purgatory of middle-class American life, accentuated by a sound mix that allows us to register the hard pop of every gunshot. While Eastwood’s musical compositions have sometimes been hit-or-miss, he’s never written a subtler score than the one here, providing faint, almost imperceptible accompaniment; in a film that encourages us to reflect as well as feel, it’s a choice that speaks volumes.

American Sniper Official Trailer #1 (2015)

SEE ALSO: The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies – EOTM Movie Critics

Production

A Warner Bros. release and presentation, in association with Village Roadshow Pictures, Ratpac-Dune Entertainment, of a Mad Chance, 22nd & Indiana, Malpaso production. Produced by Clint Eastwood, Robert Lorenz, Andrew Lazar, Bradley Cooper, Peter Morgan. Executive producers, Tim Moore, Jason Hall, Sheroum Kim, Steven Mnuchin, Bruce Berman.

Crew

Directed by Clint Eastwood. Screenplay, Jason Hall, based on the book “American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History” by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen, Jim DeFelice. Camera (color, Panavision widescreen, Arri Alexa digital), Tom Stern; editors, Joel Cox, Gary D. Roach; production designers, James J. Murakami, Charisse Cardenas; art directors, Dean Wolcott, Harry Otto; set decorator, Gary Fettis; costume designer, Deborah Hopper; sound (Dolby Digital/Datasat), Walt Martin; sound designer, Tom Ozanich; supervising sound editors, Alan Robert Murray, Bub Asman; re-recording mixers, John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff; special effects supervisor, Steven Riley; special effects coordinator, Brendon O’Dell; stunt coordinators, Jeff Habberstad, Trevor Habberstad; visual effects supervisor, Michael Owens; visual effects, MPC, Pacific Title & Art Studio, Sony Pictures Imageworks, Image Engine, Lola; assistant director, David M. Bernstein; second unit director, Robert Lorenz; second unit camera, Barry Idoine; casting, Geoffrey Miclat.

Starring

Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, Luke Grimes, Jake McDorman, Cory Hardrict, Kevin Lacz, Navid Negahban, Keir O’Donnell, Cole Konis, Luke Sunshine, Mido Hamada, Sammy Sheik. (English, Arabic dialogue)
Read more: Variety



300: Rise of an Empire

Published by EOTM News Editor on March 7th, 2014 - in Entertainment News, Film, Movies

Warner Bros. Pictures/AP Photo

Movie Pass: “300: Rise Of An Empire” (via CNN Video)

A sequel to the hit historic epic arrives in theaters with a strong feminine twist! CNN’s Topher Gauk-Roger has more!

 

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Movie News: Drone Strike, ‘Catching Fire,’ and Girls in Engineering

Published by EOTM News Editor on November 21st, 2013 - in Breaking News, Entertainment News, Film, Movies
Times Minute: Drone Strike, ‘Catching Fire,’ and Girls in Engineering (via New York Times Video)

A drone strike in a new area of Pakistan; ‘Catching Fire’ hits theaters; and a viral ad encourages engineering. Related content: Article: Drone Strike Reported Outside Pakistan’s Tribal Region – http://nyti.ms/1iy9xrn Article: A Viral Video Encourages…

 

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Interview: ‘Where Evil Dwells’ Director ‘Massimiliano Cerchi’ on his Film’s Rise to Cult Classic Status

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Be Afraid, Be Very Afraid: ‘Massimiliano (Max) Cerchi ‘ Brings Horror To Life In ‘Where Evil Dwells’

 

Carla B. of EOTM chats with award winning director and producer Massimiliano (Max) Cerchi , about his latest film Where Evil Dwells, originality in the horror genre, the direct-to-video market and how he is helping bring new life back to the spine chilling films. In the true spirit of all things horror.

Where Evil Dwells --

“Cerchi makes his living bringing to life things that go bump in the night. Distributing horror in the most visceral manner possible, with amazing detail. Nobody at the moment can make a horror film like Max. His movies are successful because they play on people’s fears and I think he enjoys it,” Carla B. of EOTM Media said.

“I am eagerly anticipating the release of his new films,” she added.

Audiences will be able to get a taste of Cerchi’s horror Friday, October 18th @ 8pm PDT 11pm EST via Horror Movie Radio, (HMR) which is powered by the EOTM Radio & Media Network.

EOTM Radio Presents: Where Horror Films Begin — EOTMs Monster Movie Podcast

HMR focuses on interviews with horror stars, directors, writers, costume designers, make-up artists & coverage of horror fandom conventions including screenings. HMR also includes reviews of films, scream queens & more.

Catch the exclusive interview live only on EOTMRadio.com – click here to set a reminder.

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RELATED NEWS: Horror Filmmaker Massimiliano Cerchi Will Film “The House of Evil 3-D” for Dark Mountain Pictures 

For breaking news on Cerchi’s latest projects like ‘Where Evil Dwells’ on Facebook & ‘The House of Evil’ on Facebook.


‘Insidious’ Director James Wan: “I’m Done with the Horror Movie Genre”

Photo credit: FilmDistrict

‘Insidious’ Director James Wan: “I’m Done with the Horror Movie Genre” (via Fandango Movie Blog)

By: Derrick Deane on September 10, 2013 at 3:48PM The second chapter to the Insidious story arrives in theaters this Friday the 13th and director James Wan chats with Moviefone about his past 10 years directing successful horror franchises and what…

 

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The Conjuring, Despicable Me 2, Red 2, Turbo and More| Box Office

Published by EOTM News Editor on July 20th, 2013 - in Box Office News, Breaking News, Film, Movies

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(EW) On a weekend stuffed with big-budget tent poles, Warner Bros.’ modest horror release The Conjuring is scaring off every one of its rival releases. The $20 million James Wan-directed film pulled in $17 million on its first Friday at the box office. That’s slightly ahead of The Purge‘s $16.8 million opening Friday in may, and with better reviews and an excellent “A-” CinemaScore grade (a rarity in the horror genre), The Conjuring should surpass The Purge‘s $34.1 million debut. Right now, The Conjuring seems to be on pace for a $37 million weekend, which double Wan’s best previous opening, which came in 2004 when Saw cut up $18.3 million.

Image Credit: Michael Tackett

Despicable Me 2 held strong in second place with $7.5 million on its third Friday. The animated smash, which has already outgrossed Monsters University, wasn’t hurt too much by the arrival of yet another animated film, Turbo. Despicable Me 2 may capture another $25 million this weekend, which would push its total to $276 million.

In third place, Turbo, which had already earned $9.7 million on Wednesday and Thursday screenings, raced away with $6.5 million on its first Friday. The $135 million film about a snail (voiced by Ryan Reynolds) competing against racecars in the Indy 500, will take in about $19 million over its first weekend frame, which would give the Fox/DreamWorks release a lackluster $28.7 million in its first five days at the box office.

Grown Ups 2 fell 61 percent from its first Friday into fourth place with $6.4 million. The $80 million Adam Sandler comedy, which last weekend opened to $41.5 million, may take in another $20 million this weekend — good for a $79.5 million total.

The Karaoke Channel Online Membership CommunityTwo new releases finished in fifth and sixth place. Red 2 took in $6.3 million on Friday, a full 14 percent drop from Red‘s $7.3 million opening Friday in 2010. The $85 million sequel may earn about $18 million this weekend. And then there was R.I.P.D., the Ryan Reynolds/Jeff Bridges action film that Universal say cost $130 million (though its budget has been reported at $154 million). R.I.P.D. earned just $4.8 million on Friday, which puts it on track for a disastrous $12.5 million debut and marks Universal’s first major misstep since Battleship.

News Source: EW