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Singer swerves a Funky, Swanky Redo of the Bee Gees “Emotion” – Listen Now

By Benjamin

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EOTM Music Critics

 

 

 

 

“Emotion” stuffed with hooks and positive vibes….

Renowned recording artist Lourdes Baron is definitely starting 2017 off right with her hit track titled “Emotion” featuring Haguy Mizrahi. In this new single Lourdes shows off her versatility, demonstrating how she is not, WILL NOT, can not be defined by individual lanes or labels. This endearing anthem will take the listener on a familiar journey through the mind, the cosmos and back again. When she purrs “wherever you go I’ll cry me a river that leads to your ocean..” I, and many others were instantly captivated if you/they had not already been mesmerized by that moment in time. It adds up to a pop, rockish master class, rifling through the seventies and eighties sounds and stacking hooks on hooks on hooks. But regardless of the genre the default mode is triumph.

Lourdes D. Baron ~ Emotion

Lourdes reinvents herself accordingly and Haguy Mizrahi is kicking the rocks too. Rather than slamming into action. A team effort detonating oneness like an infinity symbol. They must be strategizing for the long road of success ahead. I’m a new fan of the singer and will be patiently waiting to hear what 2017 will in fact bring. What will she coo next to win my heart?

You can stay connected to Lourdes on Twitter @LourdesDBaron.

RELATED: Singles from the “Back To Romance” Album – Lourdes Duque Baron

Available on Amazon vinyl and other digital platforms.

Produced by Grammy nominee, Haguy Mizrahi of Gemini Musiq ~ Label: Timeless Entertainment, Inc.

Singles from the “Back To Romance” Album – Lourdes Duque Baron

By Juney

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ffff

She’s So Fearless!

“Once again Lourdes Duque Baron shows us how everlasting jazz music is within the music industry and throughout history with her single ‘Finally‘ from her latest album ‘Back To Romance.’ “Finally’ has a calming, smooth sound that truly resonates with the soul. It is almost as if Baron’s voice carries you into another world where there is no struggle, only a tranquil world filled with harmonious euphonies. The exquisite melodies are followed by a light percussion woven with the confident nature of a saxophone — which makes for a defining sound that veraciously connects many around the world. Baron demonstrates her own defining wave with this track, which has been picking up momentum across the globe. This song and project as a whole indicates that modern day jazz is defiantly here to stay, in the ever changing world of music. Lourdes Duque Baron is leaving her own solitary stamp on music and shows all, that one does not have to follow the path of R&B, Hip Hop or Pop music to make a big splash in the industry. Baron is creating her own lane! ‘Back to Romance’ is quickly becoming one of the hottest jazz records of our era — giving jazz fanatics yet another harmonious tune to enjoy. Bravo Lourdes Duque Baron you have once again electrified the jazz community with this riveting sound!”

Click here to read the full review >> http://hubpages.com/entertainment/JazzMusicReviews

NewMusic-Reviews.com – Lourdes D Baron, ‘You Can’t Take My Man’

By: KD

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NewMusic-Reviews.com

 

Lourdes Duque Baron proves once again that she can set — and often raise the bar for modern jazz music –

Singer Lourdes Duque Baron has graced us with yet another timeless piece from her latest album ‘Back to Romance.’ The new hit ‘You Can’t Take My Man’ has a way of captivating and charming all who are blessed to hear. Whether they be relaxing in a soothing bubble bath, lounging in their favorite night club, or simply strolling by an open window or door, Mrs. Baron’s sultry, playful tone leisurely weaves through and embraces the melody of the song. It will make you stop, listen, and smile warmly while your body sways naturally to the sophisticated light beat of the sounds of music. Baron demonstrates her unique skills by incorporating a lovable amount of sass, the sexy melody of jazz, with a dash of playful delight emitting from her sultry red lips, the illustrious chords  will have you two stepping all night long. I can dig it.

Lourdes Duque Baron - Hot New Single, "You Can't Take My Man"

This hot new single has become a sensation as it makes it way around the world giving fans the voice and opportunity to tell their rivals: ” I don’t mind your sticky hands, just don’t put them on my man!” Simple yet effective, straight to the point. You Can’t Take My Man gets 4 stars for raw talent and bravery! It’s upbeat yet mellow, relaxing yet exhilarating. It’s in effect, shameless & celebratory…and I loved it. This swanky sticky icky icky original rendition was produced by the talented Mr. Andrew Lane. Cop it for yourself on iTunes, Amazon or Spotify! Stay tuned and I promise to keep you updated on more hot new tracks and other exciting projects from the accomplished Diva Mrs. Lourdes Baron.


 RELATED: E Music Critics: Lourdes Duque Baron Sets The Stage And Dishes ‘Table For Two’

Get READY: "Feeling Good At Any Age" will be on the Big Screen very Soon!! ~ Congrats Lourdes!!

SEE ALSO: Artists You Definitely Need To Be Listening To In 2016 – George The Poet

 

 

Soft Disclosure in new X-FILES, Season 10 – EOTM REVIEW, well Kind of…

New X Files - Season 10 - Image credit: FOX

By Regis Yates

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A friend called me a couple days ago and said that I should watch the 1st episode of Season 10, of The X-Files. I was told it seemed to border around soft alien disclosure. So of course, I viewed it. Considering I follow things dubbed conspiracies. If I had to surmise in one word it would be ‘jarring.’ Written and directed by Chris Carter, the episode encapsulates much of what made The X-Files such a hit back in the ’90s. Carter was sending us all a message, to all those with an ear to hear.

The most fascinating part in my opinion was everything outlined in this episode had already happened in this reality! It’s not unusual in TV, yes I know. It seems they dream it up and things just magically happen.

A point to keep in hindsight, if there is anything to this… some of y’all may need to get off the sofa, put down the remote and start taking control of y-our lives.

But how, Carla?

You probably shouldn’t have asked me that. Now, I’m on a roll! (blink blink blink)

1st step per your boy Carter:

Wake up and realize the evils we see today are initiated and put in place to create problem, reaction, solution scenarios… which are meant to distract, enrage and enslave us in our very own homes with tools like the Patriot Act, The National Defense Authorization Act, which abridged the Constitution in the name of national security. The militarization of police forces in cities around the world. The building of prison camps by the Federal Emergency Management Agency with no stated purpose. The corporate take over of food, agriculture, land, pharmaceuticals and healthcare, our very own military in clandestine agendas to filter, dull, sicken and control a populace already consumed by consumerism. The great United States of America encourages us all to shop more even when many of us are barely making it to our next pay check…and we do just that…shop.

What the hell am I talking about?! This is suppose to be a review, right? Oh yeah, it is. It was a good show. I’m watching it again, as I type. Everything I’ve written so far is pretty much how the program went. Yes, they got good and dirty with conspiracy theories. But if its happening, is it still a conspiracy? (blink blink)

Let’s continue.

They police us and spy on us and tell us it makes us safer….

A government that taps your phone, collects your data and monitors your whereabouts with impunity. A government preparing to use that data against you when it strikes and the final take over of America. A well oiled and well armed multinational group of elites that will cull, kill and subjugate happenings as we sit here and allow it to happen all around us.

The other shoe waiting to drop.

More chaos is coming and you best behold cause it will probably happen on a Friday. Black Friday.

Possible Scenario:

The banks will announce a security action necessitating their computers to go offline all weekend. BEWARE. Digital money will disappear. Yes, my friend, they can and will steal your money. This followed by the detonation of strategic electromagnetic pulse bombs knocking out all major grids. What will seem like an attack on America by terrorists or Russia or even a simulated alien invasion using alien replica vehicles that exist and are already in use! What? Yes, you got it Sherlock. An alien invasion of the US. The Russians may have been the ones to try in in 1947.

Does this sound like a warning to you?

What in the hell am I sipping on you wondering? Nothing, nothing at all. This is what the show outlined fool!! (just kidding about callin y’all fools, just playing)

Now I realize some may consider what I’m sharing is nothing more than fear mongering. Spreading paranoia dubbed by mainstream media as bogus, dangerous and so very stupid! I beg to differ. Seriously, I beg to differ, fool! Am I being irresponsible? No! It would be irresponsible and selfish if I did not write about it. But why? Everything I just shared was aired in the very episode of X Files I’m writing about! Most of this is verbatim!

You should be aware of what is happening just in case it happens. This is not behind the scenes type of stuff, this is right in our faces! And the joke is on us…on you, fool. Lol…seriously, just kidding.

Other hot topic conspiracies that were highlighted in this episode of X Files:

  • 9-11 was a false flag
  • Alien reproduction Vehicles (RV’s)
  • Free energy
  • Surveillance programs
  • the 1940s but it’s been covered up
  • Clips of Obama on Jimmy Kimmel not denying the existence of UFO’s (When Obama visited Kimmel in 2015 he denied an alien cover-up)
  • Genetic manipulation and combining human DNA with alien DNA
  • Alien abductions are not really “alien,” but rather by a secret shadow government (Many whistleblowers have come out in recent years affirming this to be true)

Yep, a lot happened in the 44 minutes of the program that begs the question…. What is truth? Who can you trust and where the hell as Mulder been for 8 years?! Oh yeah, Cali-For-ni-cating.

Hey folks, I’m trying something different here, with this quirky blog…it seems no one really takes me seriously when I write about this sort of stuff…maybe in the humor… one or two of you will see the light.

What did you think of the episode? Share with us below in the comments.

THE X-FILES (2016) Official SEASON #10 Full Trailer

E Music Critics: Lourdes Duque Baron Sets The Stage And Dishes ‘Table For Two’

By Carla B.

Via (Los Angeles Public Relations Firm) — They simply don’t make them like Lourdes Duque Baron anymore. That much is clear after listening to her latest single, ‘Table For Two,’ written exclusively for her — by Multi-platinum producer, Andrew Lane.

The ditty has a seductive, mesmerizing appeal emphasizing Baron’s vocal prowess and preternatural charm.

 “And as we dance under the moonlight – and when I look at you – I say man what a sight – And I realize that this life with you is so worth it” she croons – hitting the bulls eye, communicating with her man with an unrivaled directness.

There’s power in those words.

She’s defined her style as being part of whoever she is at any time, not part of who she’s trying to be or supposedly ought to be.

Baron’s formidable charisma and age-defying energy levels are hugely engaging as usual.  Bringing to a close the conversation with her lover… where she began. Still silky, still sultry…smoky, incomparable, indefatigable.

Mrs. Baron is aiming somewhere even higher than her predecessors, a mode of timelessness that few singers — aside from, say, Adele, who has a vocal gift that demands such an approach — even bother aspiring to. Everyone else striving to sound like now will have to shift gears once the now sound changes. But not Mrs. Baron, the ‘My Spring in Paris’ songbird is winning a new war, one she’d gladly admit to fighting.

Her work may not be familiar to the rock ‘n’ roll or hip hop generations, but if you are of a certain age or inclination, Table For Two will resonate.

 MTV.com (is a nice place to explore her music. In fact, it’s just about perfect.

Download My Spring in Paris FREE until October 31st on Itunes.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/my-spring-in-paris-single/id922578912

Critics’ Picks

E Music Critic: Recapping ‘Dance Again’ – Music Reviews

By Carla B.

20 Artists To Start Listening To In 2015

 

#1

Lourdes Duque Baron has become more than just a musical superstar and sex symbol, though she is definitely both of those things. For me — and I imagine for thousands of others — Lourdes now stands as an enduring symbol of survival and of grace. Her music is a healing thing.




[RECAP] A few additional thoughts on Lourdes Baron & her single, Dance Again.

I critiqued this song back in September but wanted to add it to our 20 Artists To Listen To in 2015. (Click here to take a Listen) - The blazin’ pop/rock single which was produced by the legendary Andrew Lane  features jamming tunes that will make you wanna give it a twirl on the dance floor regardless if you have moves like Jagger or not. It calls to music lovers, seemingly hypnotizing, edging them on to  glide along with the feisty tunes leaving all worries aside to focus on the dance floor….get ready to be bad. It’s your time!

SEE ALSO: Feel Good Music is Back — 9 Up and Coming Singers You Need to Know

Looking back on music over-all in 2014, it’s interesting to notice, not only was the pop world near-obsessively fixated on dance music but it seems to be shot through with a sudden wide-eyed reverence for the icons of the pre-Internet world, the stars who were titans back when titans were well and truly titanic. Lourdes takes us back, ever so eloquently.

Lourdes is a champion of symphony, she is my hero — and I have a funny feeling that this is exactly what she was vying for. Yes, this is precisely what she had in mind. The one who controls the musical universe and my dancing feet.

Lourdes has found countless sounds that welcome her, and the dance-pop of 2014 is one of them!

Therefore, I do declare “Dance Again” a smash, again!

SEE ALSO:  In The Beginning — There was Conscious Rap


EOTM Movie Critics: “American Sniper” Gets It Right – Trailer

By Maya Felts

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A superb performance by Bradley Cooper anchors Clint Eastwood’s harrowing and thoughtful dramatization of the life of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle

Image credit: Warner Bros

 

A skillful, straightforward combat picture gradually develops into something more complex and ruminative in Clint Eastwood’s “American Sniper,” an account of the Iraq War as observed through the rifle sights of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, whose four tours of duty cemented his standing as the deadliest marksman in U.S. military history. Hard-wiring the viewer into Kyle’s battle-scarred psyche thanks to an excellent performance from a bulked-up Bradley Cooper, this harrowing and intimate character study offers fairly blunt insights into the physical and psychological toll exacted on the front lines, yet strikes even its familiar notes with a sobering clarity that finds the 84-year-old filmmaker in very fine form. Depressingly relevant in the wake of recent headlines, Warners’ Dec. 25 release should drum up enough grown-up audience interest to work as a serious-minded alternative to more typical holiday fare, and looks to extend its critical and commercial reach well into next year.

Although Steven Spielberg was set to direct before exiting the project last summer (just a few months after Kyle’s death in Texas at the age of 38), “American Sniper” turns out to be very much in Eastwood’s wheelhouse, emerging as arguably the director’s strongest, most sustained effort in the eight years since his WWII double-header of “Flags of Our Fathers” and “Letters From Iwo Jima.” As was clear in those films and this one, few directors share Eastwood’s confidence with large-scale action, much less his inclination to investigate the brutality of what he shows us — to acknowledge both the pointlessness and the necessity of violence while searching for more honest, ambiguous definitions of heroism than those to which we’re accustomed. In these respects and more, Kyle — who earned the nickname “Legend” from his fellow troops, achieved a staggering record of 160 confirmed kills, and became one of the most coveted targets of the Iraqi insurgency — makes for a uniquely fascinating and ultimately tragic case study.

We first meet Kyle (Cooper) as he’s hunched over a rooftop overlooking a blown-out structure in Fallujah, Iraq, taking deadly aim at a local woman and her young son walking some distance away; only Kyle’s specific vantage allows him to see that they’re preparing to lob a grenade at nearby Marines. The fraught situation and its queasy-making stakes thus introduced, the film abruptly flashes back some 30-odd years to Kyle’s Texas childhood, establishing him as a skilled shooter at a young age (played by Cole Konis) as well as a brave protector to his younger brother, Jeff (Luke Sunshine). After a brief rodeo career, Cooper’s Kyle joins the ranks of the Navy SEALs, whose brutal training regimen — including the muddy beachfront endurance tests of the dreaded Hell Week — is depicted more extensively here than they were in last year’s military-memoir adaptation “Lone Survivor.”

Bradley Cooper stars in American Snyper - Image credit: Warner Bros

As scripted by Jason Hall (paring down Kyle’s 2012 autobiography, written with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice), these flashbacks form the film’s most conventional stretch, including a tartly humorous scene at a bar where Kyle charms his way past the defenses of the beautiful Taya (Sienna Miller), despite her early claim that she’d never date one of those “arrogant, self-centered pricks” who call themselves SEALs. Yet Kyle belies that description, revealing himself as a God-fearing, red-blooded American galvanized into fighting, as so many were, by the shock of 9/11 and his determination to avenge his country. Indeed, the ink is barely dry on his and Taya’s marriage license when Kyle gets shipped off to Fallujah, where he and his comrades are well served by his exceptional abilities as a sniper.

SEE ALSO: 1998 Movie ‘Deep Impact’ And its Likeness To “Comet 67P” And NASA’s Orion

It’s here that the story catches up with that tense mother-and-child setup, this time not sparing us the gruesome, inevitable aftermath. Describing his actions to a fellow soldier, Kyle breathes, “That was evil like I had never seen before” — a statement that lingers meaningfully as we watch him racking up kill after kill, efficiently dispatching the male Iraqi insurgents he spies surreptitiously arming themselves in a back alley, or driving a car bomb in the direction of American soldiers. In each of these life-or-death scenarios, Kyle must use what little time he has to swiftly assess whether his targets indeed pose an immediately actionable threat, lest he face recriminations from lawyers, liberals and other members of the Blame America First crowd (a point the book drives home far more vehemently than the film).

Not surprisingly, Eastwood avoids wading into the ideological murk of the situation and sticks tightly to Kyle’s p.o.v., yielding an almost purely experiential view of the conflict in which none of the other soldiers becomes more than a two-dimensional sketch, dates and locations are rarely identified, and any larger geopolitical context has been deliberately elided. (Some details have clearly been fudged; Kyle says he’s 30 when he enlists, but he was actually in his mid-20s.) Yet the achievement of “American Sniper” is the way it subtly undermines and expands its protagonist’s initially gung-ho worldview, as Eastwood deftly teases out any number of logistical and ethical complications: Kyle’s frustration at always having to engage from a distance rather than on the ground with his comrades; the sometimes difficult collaboration between the SEALs and the less well-trained Marines, especially when they begin the dangerous task of clearing out Iraqi houses; and above all, the near-impossibility of figuring out whom to trust in an environment where everyone is presumed hostile.

This becomes especially crucial when Kyle and company receive orders to take down the Al Qaeda terrorist Abu Musab al-Zarqawi and his vicious second-in-command, the Butcher (Mido Hamada), named in part for his imaginative use of power drills. The hunt for the Butcher — and, eventually, a Syrian-born sniper named Mustafa (Sammy Sheik), whose lethal precision rivals Kyle’s own — leads the troops into a series of breathless skirmishes, from a horrific Al Qaeda attack on the family of an Iraqi sheikh (Navid Negahban) to a nighttime ambush that develops as a result of Kyle’s extraordinary perceptiveness in a seemingly benign situation. Working as usual with d.p. Tom Stern and editors Joel Cox and Gary D. Roach, Eastwood handles these ambitious setpieces with an unfussy professionalism worthy of his subject, the camera maintaining a gritty, ground-level feel (with the exception of a few crane shots demanded by the complex staging of the film’s climactic shootout) while switching deftly among a range of perspectives that nonetheless maintain a strong continuity of action.

Less adroitly handled are the regular cutaways to Taya and their two children back in Texas, providing necessary but over-emphatic reminders that Kyle’s loved ones are paying dearly for his military service. Taya seems to have a bad habit of catching her husband on the phone at those unfortunate moments when mortar and shrapnel are exploding around him (which is understandably often). When he’s home on leave, he’s painfully distant, reluctant to talk about his experiences and barely able to function, which is Taya’s cue to spout some gratingly obvious dialogue of the “Even when you’re here, you’re not here” variety. What works in these scenes, however, is the disquieting sense that Kyle’s normal life has shifted into the war zone, and that his time with his family is passing him by in fast, jarring blips; we see his kids at only brief intervals here, and the rate at which they grow up must be as startling for him as it is for us.

In its revelation of character through action, its concern with procedure rather than politics, and its focus on an exceptionally gifted U.S. soldier struggling to make sense of his small yet essential place in a war he only partly understands, Eastwood’s picture can’t help but recall “The Hurt Locker,” and if it’s ultimately a more earnest and prosaic, less formally daring affair than Kathryn Bigelow’s film, it nevertheless emerges as one of the few dramatic treatments of the U.S.-Iraq conflict that can stand in its company. And just as “The Hurt Locker” found revelatory depths in Jeremy Renner, so “American Sniper” hinges on Cooper’s restrained yet deeply expressive lead performance, allowing many of the drama’s unspoken implications to be read plainly in the actor’s increasingly war-ravaged face.

Cooper, who packed on 40 pounds for the role, is superb here; full of spirit and down-home charm early on, he seems to slip thereafter into a sort of private agony that only those who have truly served their country can know. (A late sequence shot in an impenetrable sandstorm provides the most literal possible metaphor for his own personal fog of war.) Perhaps the film’s most humanizing touch is its willingness to show Kyle not just reacting but thinking, attempting to grasp ideas that have thus far eluded him, whether he’s spending time with veterans who have lost limbs and worse on the battlefield; coming to grips with the difference between him and his reluctant-Marine brother (Keir O’Donnell); or shrugging awkwardly when someone calls him a “hero,” as if the word were a particularly ill-fitting sweater.
Fandango’s Hobbit Movie Guide
While the circumstances of Kyle’s death add a note of tragic urgency to the film’s matter-of-fact examination of post-traumatic stress disorder, the moment itself is left offscreen, a decision that feels consistent with the scrupulous restraint that characterizes the production as a whole. The visual and editorial choices discreetly reinforce the clash between the hell of modern warfare (the color all but drained away from Stern’s images) and the purgatory of middle-class American life, accentuated by a sound mix that allows us to register the hard pop of every gunshot. While Eastwood’s musical compositions have sometimes been hit-or-miss, he’s never written a subtler score than the one here, providing faint, almost imperceptible accompaniment; in a film that encourages us to reflect as well as feel, it’s a choice that speaks volumes.

American Sniper Official Trailer #1 (2015)

SEE ALSO: The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies – EOTM Movie Critics

Production

A Warner Bros. release and presentation, in association with Village Roadshow Pictures, Ratpac-Dune Entertainment, of a Mad Chance, 22nd & Indiana, Malpaso production. Produced by Clint Eastwood, Robert Lorenz, Andrew Lazar, Bradley Cooper, Peter Morgan. Executive producers, Tim Moore, Jason Hall, Sheroum Kim, Steven Mnuchin, Bruce Berman.

Crew

Directed by Clint Eastwood. Screenplay, Jason Hall, based on the book “American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History” by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen, Jim DeFelice. Camera (color, Panavision widescreen, Arri Alexa digital), Tom Stern; editors, Joel Cox, Gary D. Roach; production designers, James J. Murakami, Charisse Cardenas; art directors, Dean Wolcott, Harry Otto; set decorator, Gary Fettis; costume designer, Deborah Hopper; sound (Dolby Digital/Datasat), Walt Martin; sound designer, Tom Ozanich; supervising sound editors, Alan Robert Murray, Bub Asman; re-recording mixers, John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff; special effects supervisor, Steven Riley; special effects coordinator, Brendon O’Dell; stunt coordinators, Jeff Habberstad, Trevor Habberstad; visual effects supervisor, Michael Owens; visual effects, MPC, Pacific Title & Art Studio, Sony Pictures Imageworks, Image Engine, Lola; assistant director, David M. Bernstein; second unit director, Robert Lorenz; second unit camera, Barry Idoine; casting, Geoffrey Miclat.

Starring

Bradley Cooper, Sienna Miller, Luke Grimes, Jake McDorman, Cory Hardrict, Kevin Lacz, Navid Negahban, Keir O’Donnell, Cole Konis, Luke Sunshine, Mido Hamada, Sammy Sheik. (English, Arabic dialogue)
Read more: Variety