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Help Transform our World ~ Participate in “Whole Planet Healing” Meditation

Published by EOTM News Editor on December 10th, 2017 - in Breaking News

By Carla B.

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A couple of weeks ago I was introduced to a group healing meditation after visiting Alfred Webre’s website, www.newsinsideout.com.

 

World Planetary Healing

As many of you know I am all for doing my part in assisting to heal our planet so when the invitation presented itself to chime in, I did and was so thrilled I decided to dedicate the time to experience all that transpired on the call. Without delving deep in the synchronicities I experienced I will just say, the direct Law of One quotes and passages read during the session were symbolic. Needless to say, anytime I am presented with a group of people dedicated to oneness, truth and understanding it’s a great day in the neighborhood. These calls have touched my heart, so I felt it necessary to share with my readers the information on the whims they too may be looking to connect with this small group of individuals set on changing our world for the goodness of all humanity on earth and the universe. Hope to hear you on the call! WHOLE PLANET HEALING – Nightly conference call – 7:00 pm PST Conference call: 1-712-770-4340 CODE 250513

For more information on Whole Planet Healing please visit: www.wholeplanethealing.com

See ALSO: WEBINAR: Wynn Free & Terry Brown, “Interdimensional Energies & Assistance from the RA Group & the Elohim” https://newsinsideout.com/2017/12/webinar-wynn-free-terry-brown-interdimensional-energies-assistance-ra-group-elohim/

Healing for Humanity: A Crystal Meditation for Peace ( https://loveandlightschool.com/healing-for-humanity-a-crystal-meditation-for-peace-after-violence/)

Quieting the Mind ~ Your Secret Self…

Uploaded by Truther 411

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Remember that the worse case scenario probably won’t come to pass…

Racing thoughts—fast, repetitive thought patterns about a particular topic—are a common feature of anxiety and other mental-health disorders. But they can happen any time you are in an anxious or stressed state, even if you are not experiencing other symptoms.

Racing thoughts may be replays of past events which generated anxiety or sadness for you. They may also be worries about things that could happen in the future. They are strings of thoughts that are blown out of proportion, have a pattern, consume time, and often have no rational conclusion.

They can look like this:

“I always forget what I have to do. I’m so stupid. If I don’t remember everything, I’ll get fired. I don’t know what I’ll do if that happens. I should have taken that job I was offered six months ago. If I lose my job, I won’t have any money. I need to work longer hours to keep this job. That just makes me more depressed. I’m so miserable. What am I going to do?”

When thoughts like these flood your mind, they drain your energy, stop you from living in the present moment, and can create a loop in your brain that feels difficult to escape. They can also make it harder to concentrate and accomplish daily tasks, and impair your memory and sleep.

Having racing thoughts is often disturbing and frightening because it creates a sense of being out of control. But having racing thoughts does not mean you’re out of control or crazy. It does mean that you are anxious and that your stress level is higher than usual.

Here are some ways you can work to calm your mind and stop racing thoughts:

1. Use cognitive distancing.

Our mind usually worries about things it is convinced are true but, most of the time, are actually not true. You can balance your mind’s tendency to predict the worst outcome by coming up with positive alternative scenarios. For instance, your spouse seems distant and is sending out a lot of emails. You decide he must be having an affair. An alternative scenario: He is working extra hard on a project. Analyze what’s most likely to happen. Most of the time, the worst-case scenario your brain comes up with is not the most likely one.

2. Use a mantra.

A mantra is just a simple phrase or word that you repeat to calm your mind. Research has shown that repeating a mantra reduces activity in the part of your brain that is responsible for self-judgment and reflection. This is the part of the brain that spends so much time rehashing the past and worrying about the future. You can use any word, sound, or saying you want. You could try something like, “Om,” “Life is good,” or “Everything is OK.” Repeat your phrase over and over, focusing your thoughts only on your mantra. If your mind wanders, return to your mantra. You can practice this almost anytime, even going around the supermarket or on your commute home from work.

3. Focus on the present.

Returning your focus to the present will help you accept and let go of what you cannot control. It will also help you realize that you can’t change the past, and that the future hasn’t happened yet, so it’s a waste of time to keep thinking about them. (This doesn’t mean that you are unaware of what happened in the past or what is about to happen in the future.) Try taking a deep breath and asking yourself how you are feeling right now.

In the video below Teal Swan breaks down how to stop thinking or stop thought all together? Are you over thinking about negative things or about someone too much? Stopping thought relates to quieting the mind and focusing on a specific subject.

“There is a voice that doesn’t use words…” – Rumi

Read more via : Psychologytoday.com

Read more via : Psychologytoday.com

4. Write things down.

Putting your concerns on paper allows you to return to them later. You don’t have to dismiss them entirely, and you can feel comfortable knowing you will revisit the concern. Also, the act of writing engages your mind and reduces the power of racing thoughts. When thoughts are in your mind, they feel chaotic. Putting them on paper organizes them. Use a notebook or a designated computer document. Once you’ve taken a few minutes to organize your thoughts on paper or onscreen, your mind should be calmer. If you want, set aside a time limit for thinking about them before taking a break and coming back to them later.

5. Breathe.

This shifts the fight-or-flight response of your sympathetic nervous system to the relaxed response of the parasympathetic nervous system. Try counting to 3 as you breathe in and to 5 as you breathe out. Pay attention only to your breathing as you try to slow it down. Your mind will wander, but just bring it back to your breathing. (See more tips on breathing exercises here.)

It takes time to develop new habits. Whichever of these tools you use, it will take regular practice over a long period of time to see results. Unfortunately, many people expect the effects to be immediate and abandon the practice too soon. Instead, be consistent and patient.

Read more via : Psychologytoday.com

…..Thoughts attract thoughts…..

SEE ALSO: All Life is Sacred & without Universal Compassion..there is No TRUE Progress

Thought of the Day: Video Games and the Human Heart

By Carla B.

Follow us:@EOTMOnline on Twitter|EOTM.Media on Facebook

Best Movie Quotes: Film – Beta Test (Directed by Nicholas Gyeney)

“One thing we must acknowledge as a leader in this field is our responsibility to shape our society. If you look where we’ve come, or arguably where we’ve fallen to, you have to ask yourself, what happened to our humanity and where did it go? In my new position, my focus is to return the spotlight to the gamers. I find that the single most important thing. And hopefully if we’re smart enough, we can remind our consumers to engage in balance, to remember what makes them human in the first place. In between missions of course. ” — Movie: Beta Test (Character Max Troy played by Larenze Tate)

“Any ambitious man would dream of reaching the top. To deny that would deny my own humanity, I think. Andrew Kincaid was a god in his own world, and any god who is obsessed with his own power sets himself up for his own demise. And that power falls on his angels. Someone had to take up the reigns. All we can do is hope for a fresh perspective. Ultimately it’s up to us to enter this world, to take up that controller, to make those decisions. Ultimately it’s your quarter.” — Movie: Beta Test (Character Max Troy played by Larenze Tate)
 

Image credit: Mirror Images LTD

      Compassion and Empathy is something Humanity must not lose…

Healing The Heart ....

Today, video games play a big role in many of our lives — as it is often the go to source of entertainment. It’s been proven that in a large number of American households  there is little fun time spent -aside from playing sports outside -without an X Box, Nintendo or Sony controller in the hand — and most recently, smart phones….and for good reason…?? As there is no denying that for many, video games can be incredibly fun to play. I still remember to this day how immersed I became in games such as Super Mario and Pac Man — all of which managed to preoccupy countless hours of my childhood. With the gaming industry capabilities consistently improving I find it interesting to explore just how big of a role video games play in our modern society and whether or not they are having any lasting effects on those who play them. According to a study released by statista in September of 2014, global video game revenues exceed $100 billion, with $6.1 billion of that being generated by video game sales in the United States alone.(1) These already staggering numbers become even more surprising when one takes into consideration the state of the US economy. How much of that $100 billion is being spent by families and individuals who cannot comfortably afford to buy that $59.99 game or that $349.99 system? In terms of time — which is arguably our most precious commodity -in 2013 the average US gamer over the age of 13 spent 6.3 hours a week playing video games -which is up from an average of 5.6 hours spent in 2012.(2) Violence, in some way shape or form has been a predominant theme in the world of video games for quite sometime. The numbers support the basis whereas the action and shooter genres, which account for a combined 51.9% of video game sales in the US in 2013. Even if masked under the intentions of playing a hero whose sole purpose is to destroy a series of “enemies” to save the world, violence is violence and gamers seem to love to engage in it virtually.

Image credit: Getty

So, it would not be presumptuous to add that many of the  video games we see and interact with today allow gamers to be as brutal as they like — within a very realistic scenario. Users can simply go up to someone — on any given street and attack them, use their vehicles to run a person down, and or even carjack them. Sexism, violence and hatred are the video game industries biggest proponents today. It seems the goal is to systematically desensitize and erode our natural empathy, our innate state of being — of oneness. Sadly, what we are seeing today are individuals being brutalized on any given street corner by someone — and passerbys simply standing by and doing nothing. In many of these cases there is hardly ever anyone coming forward to help. Why is this? Could all this violence that is engaged in virtually by so many of us worldwide be creating some sort of dark effect on us? And most importantly, is it desensitizing us? Why are we allowing this to happen? I can remember back in the day, before all this new technology arrived whereas our very own pocket communities banned together to assist one another in times of need. We sought out, maybe only **subconsciously— to be a service to others, our neighbors, friends and humanity as a whole. With this being said, I guess the only question that really needs answering is: What can we do to reconnect with our heart?? A 2011 study out of the University of Missouri-Columbia looked at the long recognized belief held by many scientists that playing violent video games can cause players to become more aggressive in their daily life. The researchers measured brain responses as they showed the participants a series of neutral and violent photos. The final stage allowed the participants to compete against an opponent in a controllable task that allowed them to choose how aggressively they would blast their opponent with sound. Researchers found that those who played a violent video game were more aggressive in their blast by comparison to those who played a non-violent game. Another study in the publication Social Psychological and Personality Science, found that aggression triggered by video games can last for up to 24 hours after the game is played -if the player continues to think about the game. The authors of the study noted that violent gamers often play for a lot longer than the 20 minutes they were allotted in this particular study, making it more likely that they let thoughts of it marinate within their mind habitually. Several authorities, including the US Supreme Court, the US Surgeon General, the Federal Trade Commission and Federal Communications Commission all stand on the side of there being no causal link between violent video games and violent behaviour. Any theories to the contrary they state are a myth, and in response have compiled a list of research to support this stance. They do advise however that individuals -especially parents -make informed decisions about what they do and do not choose to expose themselves to. Each game is subject to a rating and suggested age range, and all major gaming systems are required to have programmable parental controls. As with so many other things in the world today, I’m finding that the best solution always lies within. When deciding whether or not to expose yourself to violent video games, observe how you feel when you play them. Scan your heart. Are they purely an entertaining experience that you are easily able to disconnect from? Or are they an escape that allows you to release frustrations, negative feelings and emotions? I’d also advise to look within when deciding whether or not play video games at all. Observe your behavioral patterns to see whether you are simply engaging in an available form of entertainment or if it has become a habitual decision. Be sure to be honest with yourself when analyzing this as well, as you won’t be doing anyone a favor by masking how playing as much as you do makes you feel. I personally do not think that video games are inherently good or bad. They aren’t for everyone, and there is a time and place for them for those who enjoy them. It’s up to us to decipher just how much and when that is, if at all. Ultimately, it should never be okay to advocate any kind of violence in video games — regardless of how the 1 percent spins it. Thoughts? Please share below in the comments.

Heart Chakra | Human Energy Flow - Image credit: HumanEnergyFlow.com

RELATED: The Heart Chakra and its meaning for the human body My prayers and hopes today, right now… is for us all to take a step back, look within and exude our true power in light and love. Connecting with our heart is what we should be doing…not disconnecting from it….regardless of what life experience we may be working through. We must not lose our humanity. Peace and blessing, Namaste. Thoughts? Please share below in the comments. SEE ALSO: The Universal Law of Freewill

Our Truth is not Out there…. it is Within.

**Subconscious: acting or existing without one’s awareness: subconscious motive. noun. 2. (psychoanal) that part of the mind which is on the fringe of consciousness and contains material of which it is possible to become aware by redirecting attention Compare preconscious (sense 2), unconscious

Sources: (1) http://www.statista.com/topics/868/video-games/ (2) http://time.com/120476/nielsen-video-games/ (3) http://www.statista.com/statistics/189592/breakdown-of-us-video-game-sales-2009-by-genre/ (4) http://metro.co.uk/2014/01/16/100-best-selling-video-games-of-2013-revealed-4265929/ (5) http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110525151059.htm (6) http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/09/100920094620.htm (7) http://www.theesa.com/facts/violence.asp

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